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Proteindata

Se även: Riktlinjer för datapublicering - proteindata | Tillgängliga tjänster - proteindata

Publicerad data

Generella datarelaterade resurser

Data tillgängliga på den europeiska versionen av COVID-19 Data Portalen

Data tillgängliga från svenska forskargrupper

Vänligen notera att listan över tillgängliga dataset från svenska forskargrupper uppdateras manuellt och därför inte är fullständig. Om du vill att ditt dataset skall synliggöras eller vill korrigera information om dina dataset, vänligen kontakta oss. Publikationer som delar data där minst en medförfattare är affilierad till ett svenskt lärosäte inkluderas. I dagsläget inkluderas både publikationer som öppet delar data eller som anges att data göra tillgängliga efter begäran från författarna. Men inom kort kommer endast publikationer som delar data öppet eller genom en metadata post inkluderas i datatabasen.

Senast uppdaterad: 2021-04-13

Projekt Senast uppdaterad Tillgängliga data
Messner CB, Demichev V, Bloomfield N, Yu JSL, White M, [...], Ralser M
Nat Biotechnol
10.1038/s41587-021-00860-4
Accurate quantification of the proteome remains challenging for large sample series and longitudinal experiments. We report a data-independent acquisition method, Scanning SWATH, that accelerates mass spectrometric (MS) duty cycles, yielding quantitative proteomes in combination with short gradients and high-flow (800 µl min -1) chromatography. Exploiting a continuous movement of the precursor isolation window to assign precursor masses to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) fragment traces, Scanning SWATH increases precursor identifications by ~70% compared to conventional data-independent acquisition (DIA) methods on 0.5-5-min chromatographic gradients. We demonstrate the application of ultra-fast proteomics in drug mode-of-action screening and plasma proteomics. Scanning SWATH proteomes capture the mode of action of fungistatic azoles and statins. Moreover, we confirm 43 and identify 11 new plasma proteome biomarkers of COVID-19 severity, advancing patient classification and biomarker discovery. Thus, our results demonstrate a substantial acceleration and increased depth in fast proteomic experiments that facilitate proteomic drug screens and clinical studies.
2021-03-25
Dillner J, Elfström KM, Blomqvist J, Eklund C, Lagheden C, [...], Conneryd Lundgren K
Sci Rep 11 (1) 5160
10.1038/s41598-021-84356-w
The extent that antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 may protect against future virus-associated disease is unknown. We invited all employees (n = 15,300) at work at the Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden to participate in a study examining SARS-Cov-2 antibodies in relation to registered sick leave. For consenting 12,928 healthy hospital employees antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 could be determined and compared to participant sick leave records. Subjects with viral serum antibodies were not at excess risk for future sick leave (adjusted odds ratio (OR) controlling for age and sex: 0.85 [95% confidence interval (CI) (0.85 (0.43-1.68)]. By contrast, subjects with antibodies had an excess risk for sick leave in the weeks prior to testing [adjusted OR in multivariate analysis: 3.34 (2.98-3.74)]. Thus, presence of viral antibodies marks past disease and protection against excess risk of future disease. Knowledge of whether exposed subjects have had disease in the past or are at risk for future disease is essential for planning of control measures.Trial registration: First registered on 02/06/20, ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04411576.
2021-03-04 Available on request
Manisty C, Treibel TA, Jensen M, Semper A, Joy G, [...], Moon JC
EBioMedicine 65 103259
10.1016/j.ebiom.2021.103259
SARS-CoV-2 serology is used to identify prior infection at individual and at population level. Extended longitudinal studies with multi-timepoint sampling to evaluate dynamic changes in antibody levels are required to identify the time horizon in which these applications of serology are valid, and to explore the longevity of protective humoral immunity. Healthcare workers were recruited to a prospective cohort study from the first SARS-CoV-2 epidemic peak in London, undergoing weekly symptom screen, viral PCR and blood sampling over 16-21 weeks. Serological analysis (n =12,990) was performed using semi-quantitative Euroimmun IgG to viral spike S1 domain and Roche total antibody to viral nucleocapsid protein (NP) assays. Comparisons were made to pseudovirus neutralizing antibody measurements. A total of 157/729 (21.5%) participants developed positive SARS-CoV-2 serology by one or other assay, of whom 31.0% were asymptomatic and there were no deaths. Peak Euroimmun anti-S1 and Roche anti-NP measurements correlated (r = 0.57, p<0.0001) but only anti-S1 measurements correlated with near-contemporary pseudovirus neutralising antibody titres (measured at 16-18 weeks, r = 0.57, p<0.0001). By 21 weeks' follow-up, 31/143 (21.7%) anti-S1 and 6/150 (4.0%) anti-NP measurements reverted to negative. Mathematical modelling revealed faster clearance of anti-S1 compared to anti-NP (median half-life of 2.5 weeks versus 4.0 weeks), earlier transition to lower levels of antibody production (median of 8 versus 13 weeks), and greater reductions in relative antibody production rate after the transition (median of 35% versus 50%). Mild SARS-CoV-2 infection is associated with heterogeneous serological responses in Euroimmun anti-S1 and Roche anti-NP assays. Anti-S1 responses showed faster rates of clearance, more rapid transition from high to low level production rate and greater reduction in production rate after this transition. In mild infection, anti-S1 serology alone may underestimate incident infections. The mechanisms that underpin faster clearance and lower rates of sustained anti-S1 production may impact on the longevity of humoral immunity. Charitable donations via Barts Charity, Wellcome Trust, NIHR.
2021-03-01 Applications for access to the individual participant de-identified data (including data dictionaries) and samples can be made to the access committee
Falck-Jones S, Vangeti S, Yu M, Falck-Jones R, Cagigi A, [...], Smed-Sorensen A
J Clin Invest 131 (6)
10.1172/JCI144734
The immunopathology of COVID-19 remains enigmatic, exhibiting immunodysregulation and T cell lymphopenia. Monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSC) are T cell suppressors that expand in inflammatory conditions, but their role in acute respiratory infections remains unclear. We studied blood and airways of COVID-19 patients across disease severity at multiple timepoints. M-MDSC frequencies were elevated in blood but not in nasopharyngeal or endotracheal aspirates of COVID-19 patients compared to controls. M-MDSCs isolated from COVID-19 patients suppressed T cell proliferation and IFNγ production partly via an arginase-1 (Arg-1) dependent mechanism. Furthermore, patients showed increased Arg-1 and IL-6 plasma levels. COVID-19 patients had fewer T cells, and displayed downregulated expression of the CD3ζ chain. Ordinal regression showed that early M-MDSC frequency predicted subsequent disease severity. In conclusion, M-MDSCs expand in blood of COVID-19 patients, suppress T cells and strongly associate with disease severity, suggesting a role for M-MDSCs in the dysregulated COVID-19 immune response.
2021-01-28 Available on request
Koenig PA, Das H, Liu H, Kümmerer BM, Gohr FN, [...], Schmidt FI
Science 371 (6530) eabe6230
10.1126/science.abe6230
The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic continues to spread with devastating consequences. For passive immunization efforts, nanobodies have size and cost advantages over conventional antibodies. Here, we generated four neutralizing nanobodies that target the receptor-binding domain of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. We defined two distinct binding epitopes using x-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. Based on the structures, we engineered multivalent nanobodies with more than 100-fold improved neutralizing activity than monovalent nanobodies. Biparatopic nanobody fusions suppressed the emergence of escape mutants. Several nanobody constructs neutralized through receptor-binding competition, while other monovalent and biparatopic nanobodies triggered aberrant activation of the spike fusion machinery. These premature conformational changes in the spike protein forestalled productive fusion, and rendered the virions non-infectious.
2021-01-12
Tampere M, Pettke A, Salata C, Wallner O, Koolmeister T, [...], Puumalainen MR
Viruses 12 (12) 1423
10.3390/v12121423
2020-12-10
Custódio TF, Das H, Sheward DJ, Hanke L, Pazicky S, [...], Löw C
Nat Commun 11 (1)
10.1038/s41467-020-19204-y
The coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 is the cause of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Therapeutic neutralizing antibodies constitute a key short-to-medium term approach to tackle COVID-19. However, traditional antibody production is hampered by long development times and costly production. Here, we report the rapid isolation and characterization of nanobodies from a synthetic library, known as sybodies (Sb), that target the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. Several binders with low nanomolar affinities and efficient neutralization activity were identified of which Sb23 displayed high affinity and neutralized pseudovirus with an IC50 of 0.6 µg/ml. A cryo-EM structure of the spike bound to Sb23 showed that Sb23 binds competitively in the ACE2 binding site. Furthermore, the cryo-EM reconstruction revealed an unusual conformation of the spike where two RBDs are in the ‘up’ ACE2-binding conformation. The combined approach represents an alternative, fast workflow to select binders with neutralizing activity against newly emerging viruses.
2020-11-04
Rogstam A, Nyblom M, Christensen S, Sele C, Talibov VO, [...], Kozielski F
Int J Mol Sci 21 (19)
10.3390/ijms21197375
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), causing Coronavirus Disease 19 (COVID-19), emerged at the end of 2019 and quickly spread to cause a global pandemic with severe socio-economic consequences. The early sequencing of its RNA genome revealed its high similarity to SARS, likely to have originated from bats. The SARS-CoV-2 non-structural protein 10 (nsp10) displays high sequence similarity with its SARS homologue, which binds to and stimulates the 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease and the 2'-O-methlytransferase activities of nsps 14 and 16, respectively. Here, we report the biophysical characterization and 1.6 Å resolution structure of the unbound form of nsp10 from SARS-CoV-2 and compare it to the structures of its SARS homologue and the complex-bound form with nsp16 from SARS-CoV-2. The crystal structure and solution behaviour of nsp10 will not only form the basis for understanding the role of SARS-CoV-2 nsp10 as a central player of the viral RNA capping apparatus, but will also serve as a basis for the development of inhibitors of nsp10, interfering with crucial functions of the replication-transcription complex and virus replication.
2020-10-06
Sekine T, Perez-Potti A, Rivera-Ballesteros O, Strålin K, Gorin J, [...], Buggert M
Cell 183 (1) 158-168.e14
10.1016/j.cell.2020.08.017
SARS-CoV-2-specific memory T cells will likely prove critical for long-term immune protection against COVID-19. Here, we systematically mapped the functional and phenotypic landscape of SARS-CoV-2-specific T cell responses in unexposed individuals, exposed family members, and individuals with acute or convalescent COVID-19. Acute-phase SARS-CoV-2-specific T cells displayed a highly activated cytotoxic phenotype that correlated with various clinical markers of disease severity, whereas convalescent-phase SARS-CoV-2-specific T cells were polyfunctional and displayed a stem-like memory phenotype. Importantly, SARS-CoV-2-specific T cells were detectable in antibody-seronegative exposed family members and convalescent individuals with a history of asymptomatic and mild COVID-19. Our collective dataset shows that SARS-CoV-2 elicits broadly directed and functionally replete memory T cell responses, suggesting that natural exposure or infection may prevent recurrent episodes of severe COVID-19.
2020-10-01
Parrot T, Gorin J, Ponzetta A, Maleki KT, Kammann T, [...], Sandberg JK
Sci Immunol 5 (51)
10.1126/sciimmunol.abe1670
Severe COVID-19 is characterized by excessive inflammation of the lower airways. The balance of protective versus pathological immune responses in COVID-19 is incompletely understood. Mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are antimicrobial T cells that recognize bacterial metabolites, and can also function as innate-like sensors and mediators of antiviral responses. Here, we investigated the MAIT cell compartment in COVID-19 patients with moderate and severe disease, as well as in convalescence. We show profound and preferential decline in MAIT cells in the circulation of patients with active disease paired with strong activation. Furthermore, transcriptomic analyses indicated significant MAIT cell enrichment and pro-inflammatory IL-17A bias in the airways. Unsupervised analysis identified MAIT cell CD69 high and CXCR3low immunotypes associated with poor clinical outcome. MAIT cell levels normalized in the convalescent phase, consistent with dynamic recruitment to the tissues and later release back into the circulation when disease is resolved. These findings indicate that MAIT cells are engaged in the immune response against SARS-CoV-2 and suggest their possible involvement in COVID-19 immunopathogenesis.
2020-09-28 Karolinska KI/K Covid19 Immune atlas
Akaberi D, Krambrich J, Ling J, Luni C, Hedenstierna G, [...], Lundkvist Å
Redox Biology 37 101734
10.1016/j.redox.2020.101734
The ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic is a global public health emergency posing a high burden on nations' health care systems and economies. Despite the great effort put in the development of vaccines and specific treatments, no prophylaxis or effective therapeutics are currently available. Nitric oxide (NO) is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial and a potent vasodilator that has proved to be effective in reducing SARS-CoV replication and hypoxia in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome. Given the potential of NO as treatment for SARS-CoV-2 infection, we have evaluated the in vitro antiviral effect of NO on SARS-CoV-2 replication. The NO-donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) had a dose dependent inhibitory effect on SARS-CoV-2 replication, while the non S-nitrosated NAP was not active, as expected. Although the viral replication was not completely abolished (at 200 μM and 400 μM), SNAP delayed or completely prevented the development of viral cytopathic effect in treated cells, and the observed protective effect correlated with the level of inhibition of the viral replication. The capacity of the NO released from SNAP to covalently bind and inhibit SARS-CoV-2 3CL recombinant protease in vitro was also tested. The observed reduction in SARS-CoV-2 protease activity was consistent with S-nitrosation of the enzyme active site cysteine.
2020-09-21 Supplementary data
Dillner J, Elfström M, Blomqvist J, Eklund C, Lagheden C, [...], Conneryd Lundgren K
medRxiv
10.1101/2020.09.14.20194308
Background: The extent that antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 may protect against future virus-associated disease is unknown. Method: We analyzed 12928 healthy hospital employees for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies and compared results to participant sick leave records (Clinical trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04411576). Results: Subjects with viral serum antibodies were not at excess risk for future sick leave (Odds Ratio (OR): 0.85 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) (0.85 (0.43-1.68)). By contrast, subjects with antibodies had an excess risk for sick leave in the past weeks (OR: 3.34 (2.98-3.74)). Conclusion: Presence of viral antibodies marks past disease and protection against excess risk of future disease.
2020-09-18 Pseudonymised, individual-level data available on request.
Bortz RH, Florez C, Laudermilch E, Wirchnianski AS, Lasso G, [...], Chandran K
medRxiv
10.1101/2020.09.10.20192187
The COVID-19 global pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) continues to place an immense burden on societies and healthcare systems. A key component of COVID-19 control efforts is serologic testing to determine the community prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 exposure and quantify individual immune responses to prior infection or vaccination. Here, we describe a laboratory-developed antibody test that uses readily available research-grade reagents to detect SARS-CoV-2 exposure in patient blood samples with high sensitivity and specificity. We further show that this test affords the estimation of viral spike-specific IgG titers from a single sample measurement, thereby providing a simple and scalable method to measure the strength of an individual's immune response. The accuracy, adaptability, and cost-effectiveness of this test makes it an excellent option for clinical deployment in the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.
2020-09-11 Available on request
Maucourant C, Filipovic I, Ponzetta A, Aleman S, Cornillet M, [...], Karolinska COVID-19 Study Group
Sci Immunol 5 (50)
10.1126/sciimmunol.abd6832
Understanding innate immune responses in COVID-19 is important to decipher mechanisms of host responses and interpret disease pathogenesis. Natural killer (NK) cells are innate effector lymphocytes that respond to acute viral infections but might also contribute to immunopathology. Using 28-color flow cytometry, we here reveal strong NK cell activation across distinct subsets in peripheral blood of COVID-19 patients. This pattern was mirrored in scRNA-seq signatures of NK cells in bronchoalveolar lavage from COVID-19 patients. Unsupervised high-dimensional analysis of peripheral blood NK cells furthermore identified distinct NK cell immunotypes that were linked to disease severity. Hallmarks of these immunotypes were high expression of perforin, NKG2C, and Ksp37, reflecting increased presence of adaptive NK cells in circulation of patients with severe disease. Finally, arming of CD56 bright NK cells was observed across COVID-19 disease states, driven by a defined protein-protein interaction network of inflammatory soluble factors. This study provides a detailed map of the NK cell activation landscape in COVID-19 disease.
2020-08-21